Transcutaneous pacing (TCP) with a Lifepak 12

Image credit: Physio-Control

 

I discovered an interesting quirk about the Lifepak 12 the other day.

I’m sure many of you have been told (as I had been told) that the Lifepak 12 cannot perform TCP unless the limb lead electrodes are attached. There is a caveat to this (reference page 4-18 in the Operations Manual – this is a PDF file so “right-click” the link and select “save as”). If you are performing TCP in demand mode (even if you have it set well below the patient’s intrinsic rate and no pacing is being delivered) as soon as the monitor detects “leads off” the monitor will deliver TCP at a fixed rate until the leads are replaced or the pacer is turned off.

For example, say you have a patient with atrial fibrillation and a slow ventricular response of 50 BPM whose ventricular response occasionally drops down to 20 (with 3 – 6 second asystolic pauses during which time the patient loses consciousness and appears peri-arrest). You apply the combo-pads and set the demand pacer for 40 PPM @ 130 mA so that the patient’s heart rate cannot drop below 40 (assuming capture is achieved with 130 mA). The patient’s heart rate stays above 40 so no pacing is delivered.

At the hospital, the nurses (through no fault of their own) remove the ECG leads to switch the patient to their own Lifepak 20. What happens? Answer: The Lifepak 12 delivers fixed rate pacing at 40 PPM @ 130 mA through the combo-pads until the leads are replaced or the pacer is turned off. Not a big deal, just something to be aware of. This is not a device malfunction.

See also:

Transcutaneous pacing (TCP) – The problem of false capture

Using capnography to confirm capture with transcutaneous pacing (TCP)

58 year old male CC: Unconscious (Transcutaneous pacing failure in the setting of hyperkalemia)

Transcutaneous pacing (TCP) for asystole

2 Comments

5 Trackbacks

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

EMS 12-Lead

Cardiac Rhythm Analysis, 12-Lead ECG Interpretation, Resuscitation

JEMS Talk: Google Hangout

Comments
Jared
59 Year Old Male: Unwell
Field Dx: Uncompensated cardiogenic shock. Tachycardia caused by compensation mechanism. Probable cause: Complete heart block due to the global nature of the changes. Tx: O2 @ 15 lpm NRB and possibly CPAP if pressure rises enough, 324 ASA, amio drip, possible norepi, and diesel. Put pads on in case he tanks. Definitive Tx: Needs cathed.
2015-07-02 17:46:57
Jonas
59 Year Old Male: Unwell
CPAP. IV. Nitro if BP can be controlled. Kidneys may be in acute failure causing extra fluid, or CHF, or both. Big ole triangular looking t-waves would have me thinking calcium. Monitor to see if conditions improve with CPAP. Place pads on patient, and have help with you in the ambulance.
2015-07-02 17:17:30
Brian Brubaker
59 Year Old Male: Unwell
At a quick glance it looks like tombstones (R on T). At closer look without calipers, it appears to be accelerated ideoventricular rhythm due to complete heart block. Not enough information to go off of, so cardioverting or pacing might just kill the patient quicker than anything. Transport immediately since his sick heart could stop…
2015-07-02 05:49:02
Holden
59 Year Old Male: Unwell
I've only studied cardiology for a few months and have read Dubin's book 1.5 times so I'm not an expert by any means. However, can a possible interpretation be a junctional tachycardia with aberrant ventricular conduction and a STEMI? No P waves and aberrancy causing a slightly wide QRS (but not wide enough for V-Tach).
2015-07-02 00:50:22
James
59 Year Old Male: Unwell
This is a ugly EKG. Wide complex irregular tachycardia around 150's. A-fib and a-flutter are possibilities. He's severely symptomatic. At this point, all treatment is same, electricity. If A fib, it may not want to "shock out" easily. This may be a case where initial cardioversion at max joules would be prudent. Pulmonary edema likely…
2015-07-01 22:00:13

ECG Medical Training

12-Lead ECG Challenge Smartphone App

Photobucket

12-Lead ECG Challenge Smartphone App - $5.99

  • Apple iOS
  • Android
  • Amazon
  • Web Based

  • FRN-TV video review
  • iMedicalApps.com review
  • Interested in resuscitation?

    FireEMS Blogs eNewsletter

    Sign-up to receive our free monthly eNewsletter

    Visitor Map / Stats

    Locations of visitors to this page


    LATEST EMS NEWS

    HOT FORUM DISCUSSIONS