50 year old male CC: Chest pain – Discussion

This is the discussion for 50 year old male CC: Chest pain.

You may recall that the patient started experiencing chest pain during sexual intercourse.

Many of you were appropriately concerned about the possible use of drugs for erectile dysfunction that would contraindicate nitroglycerin! Thanks for pointing that out.

In this case the patient was not taking any medication for erectile dysfunction.

Let’s take another look at the 12-lead ECG.

This ECG shows an essentially regular rhythm with no clearly discernible P-waves and wide QRS complexes (but not > 180 ms) at a rate of about 90.

The morphology of the QRS complexes are somewhat unusual, especially in the right precordial leads. If this is a supraventricular rhythm I would call it a non-specific intraventricular conduction defect or atypical left bundle branch block.

Regardless of what kind of conduction delay is present (even if it’s an accelerated idioventricular rhythm) we know that the depolarization is abnormal. T-wave discordance is present throughout the majority of the 12-lead ECG.

So does anything look like an acute injury pattern? Absolutely!

Let’s take a look at high lateral leads I and aVL.

Here we can see significant ST-elevation that is concordant with (in the same direction as) the majority of the QRS complex. It is also concordant with the terminal (last) wave of the QRS complex.

That’s bad! We have already satisfied one of Sgarbossa’s criteria to identify acute STEMI in the presence of left bundle branch block (LBBB).

Another feature worth pointing out is that leads I and aVL show pathological Q-waves.

Now let’s look at inferior leads III and aVF.

Even taking into account the wandering baseline and artifact we can appreciate concordant J-point depression.

Is this concerning? Yes!

Why?

Because of the ST-elevation in the high lateral leads. In the words of Tomas Garcia, M.D., one must always consider the company an ECG abnormality keeps.

Lead’s III and aVF are reciprocal to leads I and aVL. So the fact that ST-depression (or at least J-point depression) is present in two inferior leads while ST-elevation is present in the high lateral leads is troublesome.

How troublesome?

Troublesome enough for me to call this an acute STEMI.

Now let’s look at the right precordial leads.

Once again we see concordant J-point (and ST-segment) depression in leads V1-V3. Is this concerning? Absolutely! In fact this meets another of Sgarbossa’s criteria.

Finally, we can appreciate ST-elevation in leads V5 and V6 in spite of the wandering baseline there.

I can’t tell you what heart rhythm this patient is in but I feel confident we’re looking at an acute injury pattern.

So what was the outcome?

Unfortunately, this patient experienced cardiac arrest on arrival at the hospital and was not successfully resuscitated (which is more evidence that it was an acute STEMI).

See also:

An unusual case of right bundle branch block

An unusual case of right bundle branch block – Discussion

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EMS 12-Lead

Cardiac Rhythm Analysis, 12-Lead ECG Interpretation, Resuscitation
Comments
Sean V
Rate Related VS. Primary ST-T Changes:
Also forgot to mention decrease the FiO2, 3LPM is getting us a SpO2 of 98%, titrate down so we staying at or above 94%. No need to hyperoxygenate & create all those fun free radicals. I would also include using an EtCO2 nasal cannula, lets get another measure of our cardiac output.
2014-09-20 02:32:20
Sean V
Rate Related VS. Primary ST-T Changes:
Atrial Fibrillation w/ Rapid Ventricular Response. There appears to be possible Delta Waves, the most prominent being in aVL, also leads I, II, and V6. In the EMS 12-Lead there appears to be a fusion beat, 3rd in V2, slurred R-wave appears quite consistent with a Delta wave. I would consider WPW as the primary…
2014-09-20 02:28:16
Brian
Rate Related VS. Primary ST-T Changes:
Afib. There is widespread depression in most leads and aVR has some elevation...but I am skeptical about this ecg. If a quick fluid challenge of 500-1000cc did not slow down the HR I would give him some diltiazem (5mg increments is our protocol or 0.25mg/kg) and slow the rate down a bit and see if…
2014-09-19 21:02:48
Michael Schiavone
Rate Related VS. Primary ST-T Changes:
Isolated ST elevation in AVR with ST depression in several leads. Rapid, irregular rate suggests AFIB with RVR. I would provide entry note with this exact description and leave it to hospital whether or not to activate cath lab. My EMS treatment: IV access, 324 mg. ASA, NTG, Cardizem .25 mg/kg over 2 minutes, consider…
2014-09-19 20:30:35
Dayne
Rate Related VS. Primary ST-T Changes:
AF with RVR @167, LVH and prolonged QT. ST depression to I,II and V3-6 and reciprocal elevation to aVR equal to or >1mm highly suggestive of LMCA or 3-vessel disease. High specificity for proximal occlusion. Aspirin, GTN, IV access, Spo2 >95%, Transport to nearest PCI/Cath Lab facility ASAP
2014-09-19 10:52:36

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