Discussion for 90 year old male CC: Chest pain– Revisited

We are revisiting the Discussion for 90 year old male CC: Chest pain.  You may wish to review the case.

You may recall we pointed out that the VT appeared be regularly irregular, with alternating cycle lengths:

What follows is a "Guest Post" by Jason Roediger, CCT/CRAT, and Ken Grauer, M.D. (www.kg-ekgpress.com):

"The rhythm represents VT for all of the morphologic reasons discussed in your explanation. The reason for the repetitive regular irregularity of this ventricular rhythm is that the tracing represents VT with retrograde 3:2 Wenckebach Exit block out of the ventricular focus. The discharge rate of the ectopic ventricular focus is ~240/minute.

This results in a manifest ventricular rate that is about 2/3 the presumed discharge rate and reduces the manifest rate to ~160/minute. Note the characteristic Wenckebach periodicity conducting retrograde (with a 3:2 ratio) out of the ventricular focus in the laddergram below. FINAL point: in addition to the bizarre marked axis deviation, the entirely negative QRS in V6 with delayed nadir and other morphologic clues you state in support of the diagnosis of VT-WPW can be ruled out by the negative QS complexes in V4-V6 (Brugada)."

 

Many thanks to Jason and Ken for their insightful analysis. We are always learning!

 

 

 

 

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EMS 12-Lead

Cardiac Rhythm Analysis, 12-Lead ECG Interpretation, Resuscitation
Comments
Tony
59 year old male: chest pressure – Conclusion
Thank you Christopher. I am wondering if this particular patient is one of the minority where the LCx is the dominant artery supplying the Posterior and Inferior regions. I believe this to be the case in only about 15% of the population. Whereas approx. 80% are Right dominant.
2014-09-21 08:39:21
John
Rate Related VS. Primary ST-T Changes:
ECG is a rapid atrial fibrilation with ventricular rates approaching 300 beats per minute suggestive of WPW. Widespread ST segment depression is most likely rate related ischemia; elevation in aVR is not a reliable finding with a rapid heart rate point away from LMCA occlusion. Slow the rate before looking for ischemia, injury, or infract.…
2014-09-21 01:49:03
Sean V
Rate Related VS. Primary ST-T Changes:
Also forgot to mention decrease the FiO2, 3LPM is getting us a SpO2 of 98%, titrate down so we staying at or above 94%. No need to hyperoxygenate & create all those fun free radicals. I would also include using an EtCO2 nasal cannula, lets get another measure of our cardiac output.
2014-09-20 02:32:20
Sean V
Rate Related VS. Primary ST-T Changes:
Atrial Fibrillation w/ Rapid Ventricular Response. There appears to be possible Delta Waves, the most prominent being in aVL, also leads I, II, and V6. In the EMS 12-Lead there appears to be a fusion beat, 3rd in V2, slurred R-wave appears quite consistent with a Delta wave. I would consider WPW as the primary…
2014-09-20 02:28:16
Brian
Rate Related VS. Primary ST-T Changes:
Afib. There is widespread depression in most leads and aVR has some elevation...but I am skeptical about this ecg. If a quick fluid challenge of 500-1000cc did not slow down the HR I would give him some diltiazem (5mg increments is our protocol or 0.25mg/kg) and slow the rate down a bit and see if…
2014-09-19 21:02:48

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