Episode #8 – Jim Broselow, M.D. and the Artemis Pediatric Initiative – EMS 12-Lead podcast

EMS 12-Lead podcast – Episode #8 – Jim Broselow, M.D. 

In this episode of the EMS 12-Lead podcast we're joined by Jim Broselow, M.D., inventor of the Broselow Tape for pediatric resuscitation. We discuss the Broselow Tape as well as eBroselow.com, the Artemis Pediatric System and the SafeDose app.

If you've been in EMS for any length of time you're probably familiar with this.

But you need to become familiar with this! 

Check out Artemis and SafeDose at eBroselow.com

SafeDose for Apple iOS, Android.

Follow Jim Broselow, M.D. on Twitter.

Follow eBroselow on Facebook.

4 Comments

  • J. Hines says:

    Great podcast! Interesting to hear that Dr. Broselow sees so many problems with the tape as it’s currently in use. Not sure how realistic it would be to resuscitate a child using an app, especially if I had to use a barcode scanner. When the s**t is hitting the fan I’ve found that I can’t use an app. Has that been formally studied? Thanks again for this information!! JH

  • Peter Lazar says:

    There actually has been a formal study.  Harvard's Boston Children's Hospital found that using the app with barcode scanner was very slightly better than a paper system.  And this was with nurses who were just then introduced to the app but had been using the paper-based system for years.  We expect the numbers to get even better as the app improves and people get used to it.

    The eBroselow SafeDose app has a vastly simpler and quicker user interface than competing apps, so folks should try it before assuming the experience will be similar to other apps. SafeDose gives you the mL volume to inject.  So, especially with children, it is quicker and safer for acute care when used along with the Broselow Tape or the cheaper, generic, PediaTape.

    [Editor's note: Peter is a representative of eBroselow]

  • It is not really that I see so many problems with the Tape as it is being used. It is just that the Tape has limited real estate while the numberof drugs and indications rise exponentially. There just isn't enough room to put all the relevant medication doses, conversions to mLs, dilutions, adverse effects,etc along with equipment in a single box. This is especially relevant at the hospital level.

  • Cyrus Swanson says:

    Very helpful info, thanks. Mr. Lazar, could you please let us know the specific article you reference in your post above? I'd like to take a look at that study from Boston Children's using the app vs the paper system.
    Thank you

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EMS 12-Lead

Cardiac Rhythm Analysis, 12-Lead ECG Interpretation, Resuscitation

JEMS Talk: Google Hangout

Comments
Olivier
Snapshot Case: What Happened?
To support Donovan's analysis, QRS are remarkably thin and eventually consistent with paediatric findings. However, as noted, atrial fibrillation in very young patients are quite rare.
2015-05-28 07:36:54
Donovan
Snapshot Case: What Happened?
Looking back on the dosages, though, it occurs to me: this may be a pediatric patient. If that is the case, then for 50 J to be an appropriate dose for Shock 4 (again, assuming the patient is unstable), they would have to weight 25 kg. If that is the case, then the accidental induction…
2015-05-28 01:46:30
Donovan
Snapshot Case: What Happened?
1) Why convert the first rhythm? (brought up by a couple of commenters) -- As is posted in the initial: "required emergent cardioversion for unstable rapid atrial fibrillation" ... rate is not the determining factor about stability, the presence or absence of signs of shock are (hypotension, acutely altered mental status, ischemic chest pain, usw).…
2015-05-28 01:27:57
Ruud Valkenborg
Snapshot Case: What Happened?
Beautyfull R on T with a unsynchronised ECV. :-)
2015-05-27 07:38:19
george
Snapshot Case: What Happened?
why cardiovert urgently in this case? The first strip shows a "well controlled" heart rate. Cardioversion provoked torsade de points due to unsync administration....... Unnecessary risk taken......when amiodarone or flecainide would do the job "quietly".....
2015-05-27 06:46:53

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