62 year old male: Chest Discomfort – Conclusion

This is the conclusion to our three part case series, 62 year old male: Chest Discomfort. Before reading the conclusion, we suggest you check out Part I and Part II. Thanks again to Vince DiGiulio, EMT-CC for this wonderful case!

When we last left off, our patient had experienced a resolution of his chest pain accompanied by changes on his 12-Lead ECG. The ED physician had called cardiology, but they were unimpressed. Are we comfortable with this?

Let’s review our patients’ ¬†first 12-Lead.

Well Page Him Again - Initial 12-Lead

We have a narrow complex, regular rhythm at 90 bpm consistent with a normal sinus rhythm. Flat or downsloping ST segments are visible in leads III and aVF. Additionally, ST-Elevation is present in leads V1 through V4. As some readers pointed out, this is diagnostic for an Anterior Wall Myocardial Infarction. There are also some subtle hints that this is not a normal variant:

  • Dr. Smith included in the comments that the R-wave amplitude of V2-V4 is only 10 mm. In cases of AWMI, a loss of precordial R-wave amplitude is often noted.
  • If you compare the T-waves in V1 and V6, you’ll note that they are much larger in V1 than in V6. Dr. Henry J. L. Marriott describes this finding as a “loss of precordial T-wave balance.” Dr. Mattu covers this in depth in his excellent video New Tall T-Waves in V1.

The most important point is that there is no other explanation for our patient’s ST-Elevation. There is no LVH or BBB present and Early Repolarization is a diagnosis of exclusion in a 62 year old patient.

Regardless, any patient with chest pain should be evaluated with serial ECG’s. During our patient’s second 12-Lead, he happened to be pain free:

Well Page Him Again - Repeat 12-Lead

Our repeat 12-Lead shows a normal sinus rhythm, with the development of terminal T-wave inversions in leads V1-V4. Several of our readers correctly pointed out that these are the hallmarks of the eponymous Wellens’ Syndrome (or Wellens’ Warning). Interestingly enough, the computer’s interpretation now displays *** ACUTE MI ***.

Well Page Him Again - Wellens Syndrome

So what is the importance of this finding?

In 1982, Hein JJ Wellens identified two types of abnormal T-waves associated with critical, proximal LAD stenosis. The first type, not seen in our case, features deeply inverted, symmetric T-waves in the anterior precordial leads. The second type, featured above, are characterized by biphasic T-waves. In his seminal study, Wellens found that these electrocardiographic patterns were most often seen during pain free periods. Subsequent studies showed that nearly every patient with Wellens’ Syndrome had blockage in the LAD, ranging from 50-100%!

So what happened with our patient?

Our patient continued to experience transient episodes of chest pain. His troponin-I levels returned at 1.09 ng/mL 20 minutes after the pain-free ECG. Recognizing Wellens’ Syndrome, the ED physician had the patient transferred directly to the cath lab for immediate PCI.

Key points highlighted by this case:

  • Obtain Serial ECG’s!
  • A single ECG diagnostic for STEMI is indication for cath lab activation.
  • Resolution of chest pain is not a reason to withold aspirin.
  • Wellens’ Sydrome strongly suggests an advanced degree of LAD stenosis and requires urgent evaluation.

References

  • Dr. Smith’s ECG Blog – Wellens’ Syndrome
  • de Zwann C, Bar FW, Wellens HJJ. Characteristic electrocardiographic pattern indicating a critical stenosis high in left anterior descending coronary artery in patients admitted because of impending myocardial infarction. Am Heart J 1982; 103:730-736. [PubMed]
  • Parikh KS, Agarwal R, Mehrota AK, Swamy RS. Wellens syndrome: a life-saving diagnosis. Am J Emerg Med 2012; 30:255e3-255e5. [PubMed]
  • Rhinehardt J, Brady WJ, Perron AD, Mattu A. Electrocardiographic manifestations of Wellens’ syndrome. Am J Emerg Med 2002; 20(7):638-43. [PubMed]

1 Comment

  • At the time of the initial ECG, the artery is occluded and it is an anterior STEMI.  The second one that looks like Wellens' is when the artery has spontaneously opened.  Actually, Wellens' did not have a first diagnostic ECG in any of the cases in his series, he only had the one with the T-wave inversion.  There had not been any ECG recorded at the time of the chest pain and so they never caught the ST elevation, as we see here.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

EMS 12-Lead

Cardiac Rhythm Analysis, 12-Lead ECG Interpretation, Resuscitation

JEMS Talk: Google Hangout

Comments
know it all parapup
83 Year Old Male: Shortness of Breath
@ Kyle I would question your authority to call out people for not having a license or being a know it all parapup when your tx basically entails "call medical control." I think we can both agree that his cardiac output is not great at all. I assume your reluctance to give him any other…
2014-10-30 20:26:11
Kyle
83 Year Old Male: Shortness of Breath
Well st elevation in avr and v1 associated with anterior and lateral depression would call for possible posterior wall MI. 15 lead would be in order. Also check all the leads for appropriate placing. If v7, v8, and v9 show the elevation i would treat as a STEMI per my protocol. Asprin only until medical…
2014-10-30 18:14:05
Tim
The most awesome STEMI test on the internet!
Thanks for the app. It made me think about all that one may see in the field. The only problem was I never got a score or saw the results of how I did other than saying I had completed the test. Anyway a great way to get the old brain working.
2014-10-30 13:14:27
Brian
83 Year Old Male: Shortness of Breath
I mostly agree with dustin. I believe this is may be an isolated posterior MI. The R wave in V2 points to it being a posterior MI. otherwise it is a 1st degree av block with a LAHB. I am somewhat concerned with the concordant t segment depression noted and in fact if you were…
2014-10-30 04:22:44
Karl Brennan
Understanding Amiodarone
Great article , however in VF caused by hyperkalemia it should be avoided along with lidocaine , Since it shuts down the K channels, the eiteiology of the arrest hyper K, K channels are needed to exchange K in the cell. Calcium , Bicarbonate, dextrose and insulin should be used to decrease K levels along…
2014-10-30 03:04:45
Taking It With You
Taking It With You
Night at the Movies
Night at the Movies
A REAL Emergency!
A REAL Emergency!
What is Experience?
What is Experience?
Streets: Nine and a Half D
Streets: Nine and a Half D

STEMI Expert?

  • Click here to find out!
  • 12-Lead ECG Challenge Smartphone App

    Photobucket

    12-Lead ECG Challenge Smartphone App - $5.99

  • Apple iOS
  • Android
  • Amazon
  • Web Based

  • FRN-TV video review
  • iMedicalApps.com review
  • Interested in resuscitation?

    FireEMS Blogs eNewsletter

    Sign-up to receive our free monthly eNewsletter

    Visitor Map / Stats

    Locations of visitors to this page


    LATEST EMS NEWS

    HOT FORUM DISCUSSIONS