Understanding Atropine

As requested, during our previous Adenosine discussion, we will briefly review, Parasympathetic stimulation and Atropine pharmacodynamics on the heart.

ACETYLCHOLINE (ACh) is one of the Neurotransmitters, a chemical signal, used by the Central Nervous System, which has many effects on the body, from stimulating muscle contraction, inducing peristalsis (digestion), Bile release by the liver, and as discussed here, decreasing Sinoatrial Node (SAN) and Atrioventricular Node (AVN) stimulation. When the later occurs, often we encounter its effect recorded on the ECG, seen as:

  • Sinus Bradycardia
  • SA Blocks
  • AV Blocks

The most common symptoms of Vagal stimulation include:

  • Vasovagal Syncope
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Dizziness

ACh is released during Vagus Nerve (Cranial Nerve X) stimulation ,which in the heart, binds to M2 Muscarinic Receptors, one of the 5 types of Muscarinic Receptors, which mainly work in CNS and skeletal muscle. Out of all these receptors, binding of ACh to M2 receptors affects the heart and its overall conductivity.

How does this work?

  • Decrease Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (cAMP) intracellular
  • This slows down L-type Calcium Channel opening, leading to decreased automaticity and slightly decreasing contractility
  • Potassium (K+) efflux (leaving the cell) is delayed, which prolongs repolarization, delaying the next action potential

The combination of all these actions, hyperpolarize the cells, increasing SA Nodal and AV Nodal threshold, which decreases the overall conduction, mainly through the AVN. This is known as Negative Dromotropic Effect.

 

ATROPINE

atropine

Atropine, an antichollinergic, derived from the plant, Atropa Belladonna, or “Deadly Nightshade flower”,  blocks ACh binding to M2 receptors, giving it the “Parasympatholytic” property. The goal is not necessarily to increase SAN function, but rather, block the parasympathetic  response produced by M2 receptor stimulation, leading to normal SAN and AVN function.

 Now that we understand how Vagal Stimulation affects our cardiac function, the use of Atropine makes a bit more sense during suspected bradycardia induced symptoms.

 

2 Comments

  • James M says:

    I love these drug summaries. Thanks a lot, Ivan, for taking the time to do them. I look forward to seeing more! Perhaps amiodarone?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

EMS 12-Lead

Cardiac Rhythm Analysis, 12-Lead ECG Interpretation, Resuscitation

JEMS Talk: Google Hangout

Comments
know it all parapup
83 Year Old Male: Shortness of Breath
@ Kyle I would question your authority to call out people for not having a license or being a know it all parapup when your tx basically entails "call medical control." I think we can both agree that his cardiac output is not great at all. I assume your reluctance to give him any other…
2014-10-30 20:26:11
Kyle
83 Year Old Male: Shortness of Breath
Well st elevation in avr and v1 associated with anterior and lateral depression would call for possible posterior wall MI. 15 lead would be in order. Also check all the leads for appropriate placing. If v7, v8, and v9 show the elevation i would treat as a STEMI per my protocol. Asprin only until medical…
2014-10-30 18:14:05
Tim
The most awesome STEMI test on the internet!
Thanks for the app. It made me think about all that one may see in the field. The only problem was I never got a score or saw the results of how I did other than saying I had completed the test. Anyway a great way to get the old brain working.
2014-10-30 13:14:27
Brian
83 Year Old Male: Shortness of Breath
I mostly agree with dustin. I believe this is may be an isolated posterior MI. The R wave in V2 points to it being a posterior MI. otherwise it is a 1st degree av block with a LAHB. I am somewhat concerned with the concordant t segment depression noted and in fact if you were…
2014-10-30 04:22:44
Karl Brennan
Understanding Amiodarone
Great article , however in VF caused by hyperkalemia it should be avoided along with lidocaine , Since it shuts down the K channels, the eiteiology of the arrest hyper K, K channels are needed to exchange K in the cell. Calcium , Bicarbonate, dextrose and insulin should be used to decrease K levels along…
2014-10-30 03:04:45

STEMI Expert?

  • Click here to find out!
  • 12-Lead ECG Challenge Smartphone App

    Photobucket

    12-Lead ECG Challenge Smartphone App - $5.99

  • Apple iOS
  • Android
  • Amazon
  • Web Based

  • FRN-TV video review
  • iMedicalApps.com review
  • Interested in resuscitation?

    FireEMS Blogs eNewsletter

    Sign-up to receive our free monthly eNewsletter

    Visitor Map / Stats

    Locations of visitors to this page


    LATEST EMS NEWS

    HOT FORUM DISCUSSIONS