Snapshot Case: What Happened?

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Snapshot cases are tracings where we do not have good patient follow-up—or sometimes even clinical information—but still feel there are points worth discussing.   This is a patient who required emergent cardioversion for unstable rapid atrial fibrillation. What happened?   Tracing shared by Rob McDonald, and emergency department nurse in Queensland, Australia.

Proficiency vs Deficiency… The Art Of Electrocardiography Analysis

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Understanding the different types of  assessments, assessment tools, and findings acquired from these assessments, are all part of proper patient care in both acute and chronic emergency medicine management, in every realm of the term “PATIENT CARE”. One of the most important tools, in both the prehospital setting and long term care, is the 12 […]

Transcutaneous Pacing Success!!! Part 2

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This is the second half of a two-part case presentation examining transcutaneous pacing. If you didn’t see yesterday’s post I highly suggest checking out Part 1 before continuing, but if you hate learning I suppose you can start here. Yesterday we examined a series of tracings that depicted transcutaneous pacing (TCP) in all its stages: […]

Transcutaneous Pacing Success!!! Part 1

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Anyone trained in transcutaneous pacing (TCP) needs to be able to identify the rhythm below instantly. It shows a patient being transcutaneously paced at 80 bpm and 125 mA on a LifePak 12 [the strip is labelled 130 mA but that refers to a point just past the end of the paper, I promise]. Well, […]

Revolutionizing Pediatric Resuscitation, JEMS Games Finals, and a Very Serious Topic #EMSToday2015

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Friday, February 27 Okay, I admit it. I’m 43 years old and I can’t party like I used to. I needed a little help yesterday morning after ZOLL SHOCKFEST. But, I had an important meeting to attend with three amazing women who keep the trains running on time at EMS Today 2015 – MaryBeth DeWitt (@dewittmarybeth), […]

Meetings, Great Classes, and Celebration! #EMSToday2015

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Thursday, February 26 My day started early (these blog posts don’t write themselves you know!) and then I was off to my first ever JEMS Editorial Board meeting. As the “new guy” I had resolved not to cause too much trouble. A.J. Heightman (@AJHeightman) was suffering a bit of laryngitis which gave everyone good-natured laugh at A.J.’s […]

From Precons to EMS 10 Awards and Nightwatch! #EMSToday2015

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Wednesday, February 25, 2015 What an awesome day at EMS Today 2015! Kelly and I headed over to the Convention Center to get registered and ran into our very good friends Nick Nudell (@RunMedic), Chris Montera (@geekymedic), and Anne Robinson Montera (@CaringAnne). Nick and I started the EKG Club many years ago as an email-based discussion […]

A visit to Johns Hopkins #EMSToday2015

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Tuesday, February 24, 2015 We arrived a day early into Baltimore and decided it would be a good idea to visit what is arguably the nation’s best hospital. Johns Hopkins Hospital’s core values include Excellence & Discovery, Leadership & Integrity, Diversity & Inclusion, and Respect & Collegiality and you sense when you’re walking around that […]

The Calm Before the Storm! #EMSToday2015

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In case you haven’t heard the good folks at PennWell and JEMS have selected yours truly as the Official Blogger of EMS Today 2015. The #EMSToday2015 hashtag is already buzzing! My wife Kelly @barefootNurse24 and I @tbouthillet flew into Baltimore yesterday and it was fun to follow our international colleagues gearing up for the JEMS Games! Here we have Hayden […]

The 12 Leads of Christmas: V3

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This is the eleventh and penultimate article in our latest series, The 12 Leads of Christmas, where each day we examine an individual electrocardiographic lead. Lead V3 Sorry about the huge delay since the last post in this series—work, life, and teaching took over for a few of weeks. Today we’re going to discuss V3, […]

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EMS 12-Lead

Cardiac Rhythm Analysis, 12-Lead ECG Interpretation, Resuscitation

JEMS Talk: Google Hangout

Comments
Steve Pike
Snapshot Case: What Happened?
Thus is the story with elective electrocution. If it works, it's medicine, if it doesn't, it's murder. Every shock shown was indicated, if you don't count the first one.
2015-05-28 22:49:42
Glenda
Snapshot Case: What Happened?
torsades des pointes! Electrolytes??
2015-05-28 16:56:49
Olivier
Snapshot Case: What Happened?
To support Donovan's analysis, QRS are remarkably thin and eventually consistent with paediatric findings. However, as noted, atrial fibrillation in very young patients are quite rare.
2015-05-28 07:36:54
Donovan
Snapshot Case: What Happened?
Looking back on the dosages, though, it occurs to me: this may be a pediatric patient. If that is the case, then for 50 J to be an appropriate dose for Shock 4 (again, assuming the patient is unstable), they would have to weight 25 kg. If that is the case, then the accidental induction…
2015-05-28 01:46:30
Donovan
Snapshot Case: What Happened?
1) Why convert the first rhythm? (brought up by a couple of commenters) -- As is posted in the initial: "required emergent cardioversion for unstable rapid atrial fibrillation" ... rate is not the determining factor about stability, the presence or absence of signs of shock are (hypotension, acutely altered mental status, ischemic chest pain, usw).…
2015-05-28 01:27:57

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